Auld Lang Syne

Happy New Year!!!  (Okay, I think it's New Year's in Europe right now, lol!  It will be here in the states in 8 hours; 10 hours for here in Colorado).

While I'm waiting for my 2 year old to fall asleep for her nap (which is taking a VERY long time as she's highly anticipating the arrival of her cousins who are coming this evening) I will make true to my promise from yesterday: here's a freebie on my Teachers Pay Teachers store.  It's a PDF of my Auld Lang Syne PowerPoint.

I'm sure you all know the tune:


Since this poem dates back to 1788 and is from Scotland, it has many different versions in regards to the text.  I included the text that I found to be most common in the United States.  Now, just a little history for you: it was written by Robert Burns and is set to the tune of a traditional fold song: specifically Roud #6294.  Roud folk songs come from a collection of nearly 25,000 folk songs that were collected by oral traditional by Steve Roud, a former librarian in the London Borough of Croydon. Auld Lang Syne, the Scot's title which can be translated literally as "old long since," is traditionally associated with New Year's eve but is also popularly sung at funerals, graduations and other ceremonies marking a farewell or an ending to an occasion.

My 5th graders are in full-fledged tom-ti practice mode so I thought this would be a perfect way to welcome them back and dive right into where we left off.  We'll start by singing the song from these slides:








Now, since we've had two weeks off we will take a step back and review how we derived tom-ti from the tie between a quarter note and a single eighth note.  The definition of a tie (connects two notes of the same pitch) will be important later on in the PowerPoint.  (The other reason I want to review this is because in other areas of my lesson, through song literature containing games and instruments, they will be singing and physically and aurally preparing ti-tom  and we will be using the tie again to teach that rhythmic concept):


After the quick review we'll sing the song on rhythm:



This slide has the use of a slur, not only between the tom-ti but also between tas and ti-tis.  This will be something new that we will talk about: the difference between a slur and a tie (from above, a tie connects two notes of the same pitch, a slur connects two notes of different pitches).

The new few slides will be used in the following lesson to practice the extended do-pentatone.





And it's always good to have the students sing the song on absolute pitch names.  One of my New Year's Resolutions is to do a better job of having them practice this on a more daily basis. (SO much to do in 45 minutes!!!):



I wish you all the warmest wishes for a Happy and Healthy 2013!!!  See you next year! :)

Tee Hee Hee/Johnny Caught a Flea

This is a fun song that I learned from Christopher Robertson that he used at a ROCKE workshop in 2003.  It's a great song for do and practicing the so-do interval.

Here's the song:

 I created a PowerPoint for it that can also be used to prepare and practice quarter rest.  Here's the lyric slide:

Here the words are compared to the beat:

Here the rhythm is represented iconically:

Here's a quarter rest preparation slide in which ta and ti-ti have replaces the text:

And here's a quarter rest practice slide:

Like I mentioned above, I use this song to practice do in the so-do interval.  Here are the melodic slides:


 The next three slides can be used if you are preparing do and you present it in the so-do interval.  (I, personally, teach do in the so-mi-do pattern but there's always more then "one way to skin a cat.")
 The next two slides are presentation slides. . . each line of text is set to animation so they appear individually and allow for the students to respond to the question before seeing the answer:

 And here's the practice slide.  I use this slide in sequential order with the other melodic slides as I use this song for practicing do (that is, I eliminate the three previous slides that prepare and present do):

I created solfa ladders that can be used in conjunction with the melodic slides of the PowerPoint or for do-mi-so-la practice:

And, finally, here's a quick assessment.  I print out these cards, cut them along the dotted lines and the students put the song in order.

 Finally, here's a slide with the lyric, rhythm and melody from which the students can practice reading either rhythm or solfége.
You can download this file at my Teacher Pay Teachers store.  Be sure to check my store tomorrow for a free file of "Auld Lang Syne"!

Slug Bug!!

Happy Almost-New Year!  Yesterday I met my friend Tanya LeJeune for lunch but before we ate we went to the local teacher store (sad, I know, considering we're on vacation.)  At any rate, I saw some cute "slug bug" die cuts and that sparked this idea.  I'll be using the rhythm version in a few weeks after my 3rd graders learned ti-tika and I'll use the melodic version of the game with 2nd grade when we learn re later this year.  

Here's the song that's the basis of the game:

The kids love to sing this song, and the actions are quite fun!

Here's the "Slug Bug Melody" game that I'll use with my 2nd graders:

These cars can be used to practice re in phrases that are extracted from folk songs.
All Around the Buttercup, Blue, Closet Key, Button You Must Wander (x2), Cocky Robin, Do, do Pity My Case, Firefly (x2), Frosty Weather, Grinding Corn, Hot Cross Buns, Ida Red (Final Phrase), Knock the Cymbals, Let Us Chase the Squirrel (x2), Old Aunt Dinah (x3), Rocky Mountain, Sammy Sacket (x2)
Slug Bug Game:
Divide the class into “teams” (2-4 teams would be best).  Each team is given a “hand” swatter (Go in with a colleague and buy some: http://www.amazon.com/Worldwide-Hand-Shaped-Fly-Swatters-Pack/dp/B0057TTB5Y )
Taking turns with the flyswatter, a “representative” from each team comes up to the floor where all the “Slug Bugs” are scattered.  (You can also put magnets on them and put them on a magnetic board. This makes them visible for all  students, but tougher for the swatters to do this safely).  The teacher will sing a pattern, the first person to swat the correct “Slug Bug” earns that car for his/her team.  A new “representative” for each team comes up and another round is played.  Play continues until all the “Slug Bugs” have been slapped. The team with the most slug bugs at the end is the winner.
Levels of difficulty
Easiest: the teacher sings the phrase using solfége syllables.
Medium: the teacher sings the phrase on “loo”.
Harder: the teacher plays the pattern on an instrument.


Here are the cards:
First, I made "smaller" cards:

But when I printed them out I thought it would probably work better with larger cards, so I re-did them with two cars on a page:

The Slug Bug Rhythm game that I'll be using with my 3rd graders is identical, but it's focused on ti-tika:

These cars can be used to practice ti-tika.
Slug Bug Game:
Divide the class into “teams” (2-4 teams would be best).  Each team is given a “hand” swatter (Go in with a colleague and buy some: http://www.amazon.com/Worldwide-Hand-Shaped-Fly-Swatters-Pack/dp/B0057TTB5Y )
Taking turns with the flyswatter, a “representative” from each team comes up to the floor where all the “Slug Bugs” are scattered.  (You can also put magnets on them and put them on a magnetic board. This makes them visible for all  students, but tougher for the swatters to do this safely).  The teacher will perform a pattern, the first person to swat the correct “Slug Bug” earns that car for his/her team.  A new “representative” for each team comes up and another round is played.  Play continues until all the “Slug Bugs” have been slapped. The team with the most slug bugs at the end is the winner.
Levels of difficulty
Easiest: the teacher claps and says the rhythm pattern.
Medium: the teacher claps the pattern.
Harder: the teacher plays the pattern on an instrument.




And then I made a "Slug Bug Mix-Up" Game.  This can be used with high do, as that is the most difficult melodic element in "The Car Song."

Using either the stick or staff notation, give each student four cards (containing each of the first 4 phrases of the song).  The students must put the “Slug Bugs” in order to create the notation for the “A” section of the song
Stick to Staff: the students must match the cards with stick notation to the correct cards with staff notation.



These files can be found at my Teachers Pay Teachers Store.  Happy Slug Bugging!

Say, Say O Playmate

So, I've been on Winter Break for two days and have been spending tons of time with my own two lovelies.  It's been a lot of fun: yesterday we made "Mickey Mouse shaped" pizzas for lunch and we went to a place called "Monkey Business" yesterday with two friends from Noah's class; today we spent time with an uncle that just got into town.  And all the while I've had this song stuck in my head:


I love it, and it's great with older students.  You can isolate low ti at the end and if you're kids are really advanced you can talk about the altered tone (that fun Gb).  AND it's got a fun and challenging hand-clapping pattern.  Since I'm a visual person I had to write the whole thing out.  Here it is and it's performed with a partner:


If you want to challenge your kiddos, have then perform it with their partner in concentric circles and have them step left on the  "cross-down" to change partners (similar to "Cross Town").

I won't be posting much in the next couple of weeks, I'm going to try to actually take a "break" from school work, we'll see how that goes!  In the meantime, I have posted a bunch of rhythm flashcards on my Teachers Pay Teachers store and will have a post in a couple weeks about fun games to use with them.

Have a wonderful holiday season everyone!
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